Beyond birthmarks and beta blockers, to cancer prevention

Ahead of this week’s Morningside Center conference on repurposing drugs, we wanted to highlight a recent paper in NPJ Precision Oncology by dermatologist Jack Arbiser. It may represent a new chapter in the story of the beta-blocker propranolol. Several years ago, doctors in France accidentally discovered that propranolol is effective against hemangiomas: bright red birthmarks made of extra blood vessels, which appear in infancy. Hemangiomas often don’t need treatment and regress naturally, but some can lead Read more

Drying up the HIV reservoir

Wnt is one of those funky developmental signaling pathways that gets re-used over and over again, whether it’s in the early embryo, the brain or the Read more

Overcoming cardiac pacemaker "source-sink mismatch"

Instead of complication-prone electronic cardiac pacemakers, biomedical engineers at Georgia Tech and Emory envision the creation of “biological Read more

Larry McIntire

Delegation to Peking University advances PhD program

Peking University administrators with Georgia Tech, Emory delegation

A recent trip to Peking University (PKU) by administrators from Georgia Tech and Emory included a formal signing ceremony for the joint Georgia Tech/Emory/PKU PhD program in biomedical engineering. Georgia Tech President Bud Peterson and Tech Engineering Dean Don Giddens made the trip along with Larry McIntire, chair of the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory and Cheng Zhu, BME associate chair of international programs.

The joint PhD program was first announced last February and began enrolling its first students last fall. Students apply to the program through either the Department of Biomedical Engineering at PKU or the Coulter Department at Georgia Tech and Emory. Primary classes and research take place on the student’s home campus, but students spend at least a year in classes and research on the secondary campus.

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Biomedical engineering links Emory, Georgia Tech in medical discoveries

Larry McIntire, PhD

Despite its youth, the 20-year-old field of biomedical engineering is the fastest growing engineering academic program today. The joint Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory, with Larry McIntire as chair, has emerged on the forefront of biotechnology-related research and education.

“By integrating the fields of life sciences with engineering,” McIntire explains, “we can better understand the mechanisms of disease and develop new ways to diagnose and treat medical problems. We are working collaboratively in the fields of biomedical nanotechnology, predictive health, regenerative medicine, and health care robotics, among others.

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