Nox-ious link to cancer Warburg effect

Invitation from a talk by San Martin recently gave in Read more

Viral vectors ready for delivery

The phrase “viral vector” sounds ominous, like something from a movie about spies and Internet intrigue. It refers to a practical delivery system for the gene of your Read more

Exotic immune systems are big business

Research on lampreys’ variable lymphocyte receptors may seem impractical. Good examples exist of weird animals' immune systems becoming big Read more

Gina Kolata

Cancer’s shield: PD-1

Gina Kolata has a section front story in Tuesday’s New York Times exploring the potential of a relatively new class of anticancer drugs. The drugs break through “shields” built by cancers to ward off the threat posed by the patient’s immune system. Many are based on blocking PD-1, an immune regulatory molecule whose importance in chronic infections was first defined by Emory’s Rafi Ahmed.

Of course, not every cancer research development described as transformative in the New York Times lives up to the hype. But the clinical trial results, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, are solid enough that the researchers Kolata talks with think they are seeing “a moment in medical history when everything changed.” [Winship Cancer Institute’s John Kauh was a co-author on one of the 2012 NEJM papers.]

Let’s take a moment to examine some of the roots of this story. Rafi Ahmed didn’t set out to study cancer. For the last two decades, he and his colleagues have been studying T cells, parts of the immune system that are critical for responding to infections. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Cancer, Immunology 2 Comments