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Stem-like CD8 T cells stay in lymph nodes/spleen

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To fight cancer, mix harmless reovirus with 'red devil'

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skin

Opioid abuse medicine can control genetic skin disease

Evidence is emerging that naltrexone, a medicine used to treat opioid and alcohol abuse, can also control a genetic skin disease that causes painful, itchy rashes and blisters.

Two separate brief reports last week in JAMA Dermatology, from Emory and Cleveland Clinic investigators, describe the treatment of six patients with Hailey-Hailey disease.

Dermatologist Ron Feldman, MD, PhD is the senior author on the Emory report, which says:

“Low-dose naltrexone has been widely touted on social media platforms, including multiple YouTube videos, as an anecdotal treatment for patients with HHD, with surprisingly no published evidence until this year.”

Feldman tells Lab Land: “We decided to try it based on the patients; we had no clue about low-dose naltrexone until we met one of the patients with Hailey-Hailey disease, who came in asking for this therapy based on social media.”

At Emory, each of the three patients had tried at least four prior treatments, such as antibiotics and corticosteroids, but all were unsuccessful in controlling the disease. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Immunology 1 Comment