Triple play in science communication

We are highlighting Emory BCDB graduate student Emma D’Agostino, who is a rare triple play in the realm of science communication. Emma has her own blog, where she talks about what it’s like to have cystic fibrosis. Recent posts have discussed the science of the disease and how she makes complicated treatment decisions together with her doctors. She’s an advisor to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation on patient safety, communicating research and including the CF community Read more

Deep brain stimulation for narcolepsy: proof of concept in mouse model

Emory neurosurgeon Jon Willie and colleagues recently published a paper on deep brain stimulation in a mouse model of narcolepsy with cataplexy. Nobody has ever tried treating narcolepsy in humans with deep brain stimulation (DBS), and the approach is still at the “proof of concept” stage, Willie says. People with the “classic” type 1 form of narcolepsy have persistent daytime sleepiness and disrupted nighttime sleep, along with cataplexy (a loss of muscle tone in response Read more

In current vaccine research, adjuvants are no secret

Visionary immunologist Charlie Janeway was known for calling adjuvants – vaccine additives that enhance the immune response – a “dirty little secret.” Janeway’s point was that foreign antigens, by themselves, were unable to stimulate the components of the adaptive immune system (T and B cells) without signals from the innate immune system. Adjuvants facilitate that help. By now, adjuvants are hardly a secret, looking at some of the research that has been coming out of Emory Read more

rashes

Opioid abuse medicine can control genetic skin disease

Evidence is emerging that naltrexone, a medicine used to treat opioid and alcohol abuse, can also control a genetic skin disease that causes painful, itchy rashes and blisters.

Two separate brief reports last week in JAMA Dermatology, from Emory and Cleveland Clinic investigators, describe the treatment of six patients with Hailey-Hailey disease.

Dermatologist Ron Feldman, MD, PhD is the senior author on the Emory report, which says:

“Low-dose naltrexone has been widely touted on social media platforms, including multiple YouTube videos, as an anecdotal treatment for patients with HHD, with surprisingly no published evidence until this year.”

Feldman tells Lab Land: “We decided to try it based on the patients; we had no clue about low-dose naltrexone until we met one of the patients with Hailey-Hailey disease, who came in asking for this therapy based on social media.”

At Emory, each of the three patients had tried at least four prior treatments, such as antibiotics and corticosteroids, but all were unsuccessful in controlling the disease. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Immunology 1 Comment