Mapping the cancer genome wilderness

A huge cancer genome project has highlighted how DNA that doesn’t code for proteins is still important for keeping our cells on Read more

Stem-like CD8 T cells stay in lymph nodes/spleen

Virus-specific CD8 T cells accumulate in lymph nodes and in other organs, without circulating in abundance in the Read more

To fight cancer, mix harmless reovirus with 'red devil'

The GDBBS symposium included a talk about the next step: attaching the souped-up reovirus to Read more

Charles Staley

Nanotechnology may help surgeons detect cancer

What a cancer patient wants to know after surgery can be expressed succinctly: “Did you get everything?” Having a confident answer to that question can be difficult, because when they originate or metastasize, tumors are microscopic.

Considerable advances have been made in “targeted therapy” for cancer, but the wealth of information available on the molecular characteristics of cancer cells hasn’t given doctors good tools for detecting cancer during surgery – yet.

Even the much-heralded advent of robotic surgery has not led to clear benefits for prostate cancer patients in the area of long-term cancer control, a recent New York Times article reports.

At Emory and Georgia Tech’s joint department for biomedical engineering, Shuming Nie and his colleagues are developing tools that could help surgeons define tumor margins in human patients.

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Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Cancer Leave a comment