Another side to cancer immunotherapy? Emory scientists investigate intratumoral B cells

B cells represent the other major arm of the adaptive immune system, besides T cells, and could offer opportunities for new treatments against some kinds of Read more

Don’t go slippery on me, tRNA

RNA can both carry genetic information and catalyze chemical reactions, but it’s too wobbly to accurately read the genetic code by itself. Enzymatic modifications of transfer RNAs – the adaptors that implement the genetic code by connecting messenger RNA to protein – are important to stiffen and constrain their interactions. Biochemist Christine Dunham’s lab has a recent paper in eLife showing a modification on a proline tRNA prevents the tRNA and mRNA from slipping out Read more

Two birds with one stone: amygdala ablation for PTSD and epilepsy

It’s quite a leap to design neurosurgical ablation of the amygdala to address someone’s PTSD, and it was only considered because of the combination with Read more

Ashesh Jani

Seeing the value: prostate cancer imaging agent developed at Winship

A study from Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University has the potential to change how patients whose prostate cancer recurs after prostatectomy are treated. The study was featured in both the plenary session and press program of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting on Monday, October 26.

The Emory Molecular Prostate Imaging for Radiotherapy Enhancement, or EMPIRE-1 trial (NCT01666808), is the first randomized trial of men with prostate cancer with recurring cancer to show that treatment based on advanced molecular imaging can improve disease-free survival rates. The molecular imaging used in the study, the radiotracer fluciclovine (18F) PET, was invented and developed at Emory and Winship.

The phase II/III trial was led by Winship radiation oncologist and prostate cancer specialist Ashesh B. Jani, MD, MSEE, FASTRO, and Winship nuclear radiology specialist David M. Schuster, MD, FACR. The trial enrolled 165 patients whose cancer recurred after having undergone prostatectomies. One group received radiation therapy based on conventional imaging. The other group received treatment that was finalized based on imaging with the fluciclovine PET radiotracer. Those whose treatment was adjusted according to the results of the advanced molecular imaging showed an improvement in the cancer control end point.

“At three years, the group getting treatment guided by PET fluciclovine had a 12 percent better cancer control rate, and this persisted at four years as well, with a 24% improvement,” says Jani. “We think the improvement was seen because the novel PET allowed for better selection of patients for radiation, better treatment decisions, and better radiation target design.”

Fluciclovine PET imaging has been getting some attention in the urology/prostate cancer world.

More details here.

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Cancer Leave a comment