Saliva-based SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing

As the Atlanta area recovers from Zeta, we’d like to highlight this Journal of Clinical Microbiology paper about saliva-based SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing. It was a collaboration between the Hope Clinic and investigators at Johns Hopkins, led by epidemiologist Christopher Heaney. Infectious disease specialists Matthew Collins, Nadine Rouphael and several colleagues from Emory are co-authors. They organized the collection of saliva and blood samples from Emory COVID-19 patients at several stages: being tested, hospitalized, and recovered. Read more

Peeling away pancreatic cancers' defenses

A combination immunotherapy approach that gets through pancreatic cancers’ extra Read more

Immune cell activation in severe COVID-19 resembles lupus

In severe cases of COVID-19, Emory researchers have been observing an exuberant activation of B cells, resembling acute flares in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease. The findings point towards tests that could separate some COVID-19 patients who need immune-calming therapies from others who may not. It also may begin to explain why some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 produce abundant antibodies against the virus, yet experience poor outcomes. The results were published online on Oct. Read more

drug-eluting stent

Blood vessels aren’t straight tubes

For years, scientists like Hanjoong Jo have been telling us that blood vessels are like rivers and streams. Fluid dynamics are important; the patterns of curvature and current influence where sediment — or atherosclerosis — builds up.

One of the biggest possible perturbations of fluid dynamics in a blood vessel would be to stick a metal tube into it. Of course, cardiologists do this all the time. During percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), doctors place a stent, basically a metal tube, inside a blood vessel to relieve an obstruction and restore blood flow to the heart muscle.

Habib Samady, Emory Healthcare’s director of interventional cardiology, is leading a clinical trial looking at the effects of stent introduction on blood vessels that are not straight, but curved or angulated. To be eligible for the study, the patient’s blocked vessel has to bend more than 30 degrees. The study will look at patients who have undergone PCI for a heart attack and follow them over the course of a year. Less “disturbed flow” should mean better heart healing for the patient down the road. The study uses OCT (optical coherence tomography) and IVUS (intravascular ultrasound) to monitor the blood vessel and see how healing is affected by fluid dynamics after stent placement. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Heart Leave a comment

Possible diabetes drug/stent interaction

Diabetes and heart disease often intersect. Emory cardiologist Aloke Finn and his colleagues recently had two papers in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and in Atherosclerosis describing a possible interaction between the widely used diabetes drug metformin and drug-eluting stents, which are used to to treat coronary artery disease. Anwer Habib, MD is the first author of both papers.

The stent props the once-blocked artery open while the drugs in the stents are supposed to prevent the artery from becoming blocked again. The drugs — usually mTOR inhibitors such as http://www.magliettedacalcioit.com everolimus or the newer zotarolimus — slow down cell growth, but this cuts both ways. The drugs slow down the recovery of the lining of the blood vessel and this may contribute to blood clot formation after stent placement.

In cultured human cells and in rabbits with implanted stents, Finn and colleagues showed that metformin augmented the effect of mTOR inhibitors on regrowth of the blood vessel lining. (However — the authors acknowledge that their animal model was not diabetic or atherosclerotic.)

The findings could mean that people taking metformin would need to take medications to prevent blood clotting medications for a longer time after stent placement. The authors say that clinical studies following patients who receive drug-eluting stents should look at metformin’s effects on blood clotting events. A study examining drug eluting stents in diabetic patients is in the works at Emory.

 

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Heart Leave a comment