HD monkeys display full spectrum of symptoms seen in humans

Transgenic Huntington’s disease monkeys developed at Yerkes display a full spectrum of symptoms resembling the human disease, strengthening the case that they could be used to evaluate emerging treatments before launching human clinical Read more

The cure word, as applied to HIV

HIV researchers are becoming increasingly bold about using the "cure" word in reference to HIV/AIDS, even though nobody has been cured besides the "Berlin patient," Timothy Brown, who had a fortuitous combination of hematopoetic stem cell transplant from a genetically HIV-resistant donor. Sometimes researchers use the term "functional cure," meaning under control without drugs, to be distinct from "sterilizing cure" or "eradication," meaning the virus is gone from the body. A substantial obstacle is that HIV Read more

A sweet brain preserver: trehalose

The natural sugar trehalose is used in the food industry as a preservative and flavor enhancer. Medical researchers keep running into it when they’re looking for ways to fight neurodegenerative diseases. This paper includes patient-derived iPS cells, thanks to Emory's Laboratory for Translational Cell Read more

coma

Support from Family and Close Friends Helps Recovery

Representative Gabrielle Giffords

Representative Gabrielle Giffords. Photo courtesy Giffords’ House office.

As we watch the daily progress of Representative Gabrielle Giffords, many close observers have commented that her recovery has been moving along more quickly than expected, and took a big leap after the visit from President Obama.  Related?  Perhaps.

Emory Psychologist, Dr. Nadine Kaslow, says there is no question that love and support from family, friends, and others individuals a patient is close to, can make an enormous difference in the recovery process.

She explains that after people come out of a coma, they often seem to have a special connection to those who were there for them during the coma, even if they don’t actually remember anything in a conscious way. Efforts to communicate with the patient, she says, whether those be verbal or physical, can reinforce linking and communication. She adds patients who have physical contact from a loved one seem to visibly relax and engage more.

At Emory, as we move more and more to patient and family centered health care, we actively encourage loved ones to talk with the patient, read to the patient, touch and stroke the patient. Additionally, beds and shower facilities are provided so that family members can be with their loved ones around the clock.

Owen Samuels, MD, director of Emory University Hospital’s neuroscience critical care unit, reiterates that patient families are now recognized as central to the healing process and their presence can even reduce a patient’s length of stay. He says that in a neurology ICU, where the average length of stay is 13 days, but is often many, many more, this can be especially beneficial.

Posted on by Wendy Darling in Uncategorized Leave a comment