Tracing the start of COVID-19 in GA

At a time when COVID-19 appears to be receding in much of Georgia, it’s worth revisiting the start of the pandemic in early 2020. Emory virologist Anne Piantadosi and colleagues have a paper in Viral Evolution on the earliest SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequences detected in Georgia. Analyzing relationships between those virus sequences and samples from other states and countries can give us an idea about where the first COVID-19 infections in Georgia came from. We can draw Read more

Reddit as window into opioid withdrawal strategies

Drug abuse researchers are using the social media site Reddit as a window into the experiences of people living with opioid addiction. Abeed Sarker in Emory's Department of Biomedical Informatics has a paper in Clinical Toxicology focusing on the phenomenon of “precipitated withdrawal,” in collaboration with emergency medicine specialists from Penn, Rutgers and Mt Sinai. Precipitated withdrawal is a more intense form of withdrawal that can occur when someone who was using opioids starts medication-assisted treatment Read more

CROI: HIV cure report and ongoing research

The big news out of CROI (Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections) was a report of a third person being cured of HIV infection, this time using umbilical cord blood for a hematopoetic stem cell transplant. Emory’s Carlos del Rio gave a nice overview of the achievement for NPR this morning. As del Rio explains, the field of HIV cure research took off over the last decade after Timothy Brown, known as “the Berlin patient,” Read more

Vincent Marconi

CROI: HIV cure report and ongoing research

The big news out of CROI (Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections) was a report of a third person being cured of HIV infection, this time using umbilical cord blood for a hematopoetic stem cell transplant. Emory’s Carlos del Rio gave a nice overview of the achievement for NPR this morning.

As del Rio explains, the field of HIV cure research took off over the last decade after Timothy Brown, known as “the Berlin patient,” was cured after receiving a stem cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. His transplant donor had a mutation that made incoming blood and immune cells resistant to HIV infection.

For several reasons – safety, expense, and lack of immune compatibility — it is not practical to do hematopoetic stem cell transplants for everyone infected with HIV. Such transplants, which replace the cells that generate blood and immune cells, pose considerable risk.

“This is not a scaleable intervention,” del Rio told interviewer Leila Fadel. “This is very fascinating science, very cool science that will advance the field of HIV research, but this is also a very rare phenomenon.”

The transplant option comes into consideration when someone living with HIV is diagnosed with leukemia or lymphoma. But the CCR5 delta32 mutation that makes donor cells HIV-resistant is rare and found mainly in people of Northern European descent, and the process of finding a match has limitations. People of color are under-represented in registries for matching donors and recipients.

Using more malleable umbilical cord blood as a source for stem cell transplant may allow the approach to be offered to a larger group of people, including more people of color. Emory’s Vince Marconi told WebMD that cord blood could also allow patients to undergo a less grueling experience.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the CROI conference has morphed into a premier immunology meeting, including presentations on COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, as well as HIV and viral hepatitis. As usual, Emory/Yerkes scientists had a strong presence at CROI.

In particular, researchers such as Mirko Paiardini and Ann Chahroudi have been investigating approaches to HIV/SIV cure in non-human primate models that avoid stem cell transplants. Instead, cancer immunotherapy drugs and HIV “latency reversal” agents (one is called AZD5582) wake up lurking virus-infected immune cells and flush them out. While clinical trials

Paiardini’s upcoming CROI talk on “Novel Immunotherapy-based Cure interventions” is scheduled for this Wednesday. While we can’t reveal the details ahead of time, Paiardini’s colleagues were highly impressed when he gave a presentation about the results in November.

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Immunology 1 Comment

Repurposing a rheumatoid arthritis drug for COVID-19

For COVID-19, many researchers around the world have tried to repurpose drugs for other indications, often unsuccessfully. New clinical trial results show that baricitinib, developed by Eli Lilly and approved for rheumatoid arthritis, can speed recovery and may reduce mortality in some groups of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

How did this study, sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, come together? In part, through decade-long groundwork laid by investigators at Emory, and their collaborations with others.

The ACTT-2 results were recently published in New England Journal of Medicine. (More formal NIAID and Emory press releases are here and here.)

For several years, drug hunter and virologist Raymond Schinazi and his team had been investigating a class of medications called JAK inhibitors, as an option for tamping down chronic inflammation in HIV infection. Schinazi was one of the first at Emory to investigate the use of anti-inflammatory agents for herpesviruses and HIV in combination with antiviral drugs. He believed that these viruses “hit and run,” leaving behind inflammation, even if they later go into hiding and seem to disappear.

In Schinazi’s lab, Christina Gavegnano had shown that JAK inhibitors had both anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties in the context of HIV — a project she started as a graduate student in 2010. JAK refers to Janus kinases, which regulate inflammatory signals in immune cells.

 “Our team was working on this for 10 years for HIV,” Gavegnano says. “There was a huge amount of data that we garnered, showing how this drug class works on chronic inflammation and why.” 

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Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Immunology Leave a comment