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Gene editing reverses Huntington’s in mouse model

Disrupting a problematic gene in brain cells can reverse Huntington’s disease pathology and motor symptoms in a mouse model of the inherited neurological disorder, Emory scientists report.

The researchers used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, delivered by a viral vector, to snip part of a gene producing toxic protein aggregates in the brains of 9-month old mice. Weeks later, where the vector was applied, aggregated proteins had almost disappeared. In addition, the motor abilities of the mice had improved, although not to the level of control mice.

The results were published June 19, 2017 in Journal of Clinical InvestigationEncouraging Tweet from Scripps MD/author Eric Topol.

The findings open up an avenue for treating Huntington’s as well as other inherited neurodegenerative diseases, although more testing of safety and long-term effects is needed, says senior author Xiao-Jiang Li, MD, PhD, distinguished professor of human genetics at Emory University School of Medicine.

Huntington’s disease is caused by a gene encoding a toxic protein (mutant huntingtin or mHTT) that causes brain cells to die. Symptoms commonly appear in mid-life and include uncontrolled movements, balance problems, mood swings and cognitive decline.

Touted widely for its potential, CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing has not been used to treat any neurodegenerative disease in humans. Several concerns need to be addressed before its use, such as effective delivery and the safety of tinkering with DNA in brain cells. A similar approach, but using a different technology (zinc finger nucleases), was reported for Huntington’s disease in 2012.  Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Neuro Leave a comment