Tracing the start of COVID-19 in GA

At a time when COVID-19 appears to be receding in much of Georgia, it’s worth revisiting the start of the pandemic in early 2020. Emory virologist Anne Piantadosi and colleagues have a paper in Viral Evolution on the earliest SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequences detected in Georgia. Analyzing relationships between those virus sequences and samples from other states and countries can give us an idea about where the first COVID-19 infections in Georgia came from. We can draw Read more

Reddit as window into opioid withdrawal strategies

Drug abuse researchers are using the social media site Reddit as a window into the experiences of people living with opioid addiction. Abeed Sarker in Emory's Department of Biomedical Informatics has a paper in Clinical Toxicology focusing on the phenomenon of “precipitated withdrawal,” in collaboration with emergency medicine specialists from Penn, Rutgers and Mt Sinai. Precipitated withdrawal is a more intense form of withdrawal that can occur when someone who was using opioids starts medication-assisted treatment Read more

CROI: HIV cure report and ongoing research

The big news out of CROI (Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections) was a report of a third person being cured of HIV infection, this time using umbilical cord blood for a hematopoetic stem cell transplant. Emory’s Carlos del Rio gave a nice overview of the achievement for NPR this morning. As del Rio explains, the field of HIV cure research took off over the last decade after Timothy Brown, known as “the Berlin patient,” Read more

scientists that blog

Shoutout to Not a Mad Scientist

Cheers to microscopist and Winship Cancer Institute researcher Adam Marcus, who has started his own blog called “Not a Mad Scientist.” His first post talks about his educational outreach activities:

I have a super huge, somewhat tattered, and quite ugly suitcase that sits in my office.  This suitcase is not packed with clothes or extra large toiletries, but contains a pretty cool microscope, computer, and some shipping foam. Every few weeks I wheel it into the hallway, then into the elevator, and eventually into my car. The suitcase and I end up in Kindergarten-12th grade classrooms where I try to teach children something about science that they would not normally see.  I try to give them something different, something real, something scientific. I have seen over 3,000 children in about 200 classrooms in rural and urban schools, from pre-K to 12th grade…

We had a post in October about his lab’s research investigating Withania somnifera, a root used in Indian traditional medicine that contains potential tools for stopping breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Marcus’ blog has a collection of microscope movies, which we hope he will keep current.

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Cancer Leave a comment