Stage fright: don't get over it, get used to it

Many can feel empathy with the situation Banerjee describes: facing “a room full of scientists, who for whatever reason, did not look very happy that Read more

Beyond birthmarks and beta blockers, to cancer prevention

Ahead of this week’s Morningside Center conference on repurposing drugs, we wanted to highlight a recent paper in NPJ Precision Oncology by dermatologist Jack Arbiser. It may represent a new chapter in the story of the beta-blocker propranolol. Several years ago, doctors in France accidentally discovered that propranolol is effective against hemangiomas: bright red birthmarks made of extra blood vessels, which appear in infancy. Hemangiomas often don’t need treatment and regress naturally, but some can lead Read more

Drying up the HIV reservoir

Wnt is one of those funky developmental signaling pathways that gets re-used over and over again, whether it’s in the early embryo, the brain or the Read more

Sanjay Gupta

Sanjay Gupta shares stories on near-death experiences

Yesterday, Sanjay Gupta, MD, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory School of Medicine and associate chief of neurosurgery service at Grady Memorial Hospital, joined Emory and its community in a book-signing event to celebrate his newest book Cheating Death: The Doctors and Medical Miracles that Are Saving Lives Against All Odds.

Dr. Gupta signs his book

Dr. Gupta signs his book

It is hard to imagine having a busier schedule than the one Gupta has. On Wednesday he started his day as chief medical correspondent at CNN by discussing the new breast cancer recommendations issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. He, like other health reporters and doctors across the nation, had hundreds of questions pouring in about the controversial recommendations.

As the late afternoon approached, Gupta packed up for his visit to Emory where several hundred faculty, staff, students and neighbors awaited him for the book-signing event. After spending time presenting and answering questions, and then signing books for many people, Gupta again packed up and headed back to the CNN studio for a live show with Larry King.

Dr. Gupta presents

Dr. Gupta presents

During his presentation at Emory, Gupta talked about his experiences that led to his book. He notes one CNN story took him to Norway to meet the woman who had been skiing and slipped through a hole in the ice with her head caught under freezing water for an hour.

After an amazing rescue, Anna BÃ¥genholm was taken to the emergency room where the doctors did not give up. A doctor on the helicopter said there was a completely flat line. No signs of life whatsoever. But the team persevered and saved her life by warming her body very slowly. Even though BÃ¥genholm was alive, months of recovery lay ahead. Paralyzed for almost a year until her damaged nerves healed, she today is a radiologist at the hospital where she was saved. She has returned to skiing and other sports.

Read more about Gupta in Emory Magazine. Learn more about Gupta’s stories from on the road.

Posted on by sgoodwin in Uncategorized Leave a comment

CNN reporter and Emory doctor tells his story

Sanjay Gupta, MD, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory School of Medicine and associate chief of neurosurgery service at Grady Memorial Hospital, navigates a busy schedule as a practicing doctor and the internationally known face of health reporting for CNN.

Sanjay Gupta, MD

Sanjay Gupta, MD

Next week, on Nov. 18, Gupta shares his story and discusses his new book at a book signing event at Emory. His book is titled “Cheating Death: The Doctors and Medical Miracles that Are Saving Lives Against All Odds.”

In a recent article, Emory Magazine profiles Gupta and remarkable journey:

  • Gupta can barely disguise the wonder he still feels when he ponders the complex circuitry of the human brain. And he can barely contain the wonder he feels when he is called upon to care for a patient, the way he saw doctors care for his grandfather.
  • “I love the intellectual challenge of it. I love the technical challenge of it. But at the end of the day—if someone comes in with a tumor or some kind of chronic pain issue that I can help in some way—that’s a remarkable feeling,” he says. “I operated all day Monday, and I walked home and told my wife all about my day, and it’s one of the most satisfying things I can do.”
  • Gupta reports from the field

    Gupta reports from the field

    Barely sixteen when he was accepted into an accelerated program to enter medical school, Gupta fast-tracked his career along parallel yet complementary paths. He wanted to be a great doctor and a great communicator. He wanted to heal patients, and he wanted to hear them.

  • Those interests synthesized when he joined CNN as its chief medical correspondent. With his straightforward yet reassuring manner, he has become the nation’s calm voice of medical reason—a doctor who possesses the rare ability to talk to the camera as if he were talking to a patient. He speaks, and somehow we believe he wouldn’t mind taking all the time in the world to help us separate facts from fears.

Read more about Gupta in Emory Magazine. Learn more about Gupta’s book signing event. For stories from Gupta on the road, visit here.

Posted on by Kathi Baker in Uncategorized Leave a comment

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: CNN correspondent & Emory doctor

Millions of TV viewers know Dr. Sanjay Gupta as CNN’s chief medical correspondent. But did you know that off the air, Dr. Gupta is a practicing trauma neurosurgeon at nearby Grady Memorial Hospital? Gupta, like most of the doctors at the hospital, is an Emory physician. CNN medical producer Danielle Dellorto put together this video showing what his life as a surgeon is like.


 

 

Gupta works with Emory doctors on CNN as well. Two of the four members on Gupta’s CNNHealth.com medical advisory team are Emory doctors.

You can see correspondent Gupta on “Paging Dr. Gupta” on CNN 6-10 a.m., Monday-Friday or read the Paging Dr. Gupta Blog.

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