Mapping the cancer genome wilderness

A huge cancer genome project has highlighted how DNA that doesn’t code for proteins is still important for keeping our cells on Read more

Stem-like CD8 T cells stay in lymph nodes/spleen

Virus-specific CD8 T cells accumulate in lymph nodes and in other organs, without circulating in abundance in the Read more

To fight cancer, mix harmless reovirus with 'red devil'

The GDBBS symposium included a talk about the next step: attaching the souped-up reovirus to Read more

mTOR

Unexpected effect on flu immunity

Immunologists reported recently that the drug rapamycin, normally used to restrain the immune system after organ transplant, has the unexpected ability to broaden the activity of a flu vaccine.

The results, published in Nature Immunology, indicate that rapamycin steers immune cells away from producing antibodies that strongly target a particular flu strain, in favor of those that block a wide variety of strains. The results could help in the effort to develop a universal flu vaccine.

This study was inspired by a 2009 Nature study from Koichi Araki and Emory Vaccine Center director Rafi Ahmed, reports Jon Cohen in Science magazine. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Immunology Leave a comment