Give a zap to Emory brain research for #STATMadness

Vote for Emory neuroscience research next week as part of Read more

Nox-ious link to cancer Warburg effect

Invitation from a talk by San Martin recently gave in Read more

Viral vectors ready for delivery

The phrase “viral vector” sounds ominous, like something from a movie about spies and Internet intrigue. It refers to a practical delivery system for the gene of your Read more

mouse models

Amyloid vs tau? With this AD target, no need to choose

Keqiang Ye’s lab at Emory recently published a paper in Nature Communications that offers a two for one deal in Alzheimer’s drug discovery.

Periodically we hear suggestions that the amyloid hypothesis, the basis of much research on Alzheimer’s disease, is in trouble. Beta-amyloid is a toxic protein fragment that accumulates in extracellular brain plaques in Alzheimer’s, and genetics for early-onset Alzheimer’s point to a driver role for amyloid too.

In mice, inhibiting AEP hits two targets (amyloid and tau) with one shot

Unfortunately, anti-amyloid agents (either antibodies that sop up beta-amyloid or drugs that steer the body toward making less of it) have not shown clear positive effects in clinical trials.

That may be because the clinical trials started too late or the drugs weren’t dosed/delivered right, but there is a third possibility: modifying amyloid by itself is not enough.

Ye’s lab has been investigating an enzyme called AEP (asparagine endopeptidase), which he provocatively calls “delta secretase.” AEP is involved in processing both amyloid and tau, amyloid’s intracellular tangle-forming counterpart. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Neuro Leave a comment