Genomics plus human intelligence

The power of gene sequencing to solve puzzles when combined with human Read more

'Master key' microRNA has links to both ASD and schizophrenia

Recent studies of complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have identified a few "master keys," risk genes that sit at the center of a network of genes important for brain function. Researchers at Emory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have created mice partially lacking one of those master keys, called MIR-137, and have used them to identify an angle on potential treatments for ASD. The results were published this Read more

Shape-shifting RNA regulates viral sensor

OAS senses double-stranded RNA: the form that viral genetic material often takes. Its regulator is also Read more

mitochondrial disorders

Mitochondrial blindness — Newman’s Emory story

Neuro-ophthalmologist Nancy Newman’s 2017 Dean’s Distinguished Faculty Lecture and Award were unexpectedly timely. Her talk on Tuesday was a tour of her career and mitochondrial disorders affecting vision, culminating in a description of gene therapy clinical trials for the treatment of Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy.

The sponsor of those studies, Gensight Biologics, recently presented preliminary data on a previous study of their gene therapy at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in April. Two larger trials (REVERSE and RESCUE) are ongoing.

Despite all the progress, there are still several puzzles connected with mitochondrial diseases affecting vision and particularly Leber’s, the first human disease linked to mitochondrial DNA mutations by Douglas Wallace at Emory in the 1980s.

Newman called Leber’s an “ideal laboratory” for studying mitochondrial diseases of vision, because deterioration of vision in Leber’s tends to happen to one eye first, presenting a window of opportunity to deliver treatment to the other eye. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Neuro Leave a comment