HD monkeys display full spectrum of symptoms seen in humans

Transgenic Huntington’s disease monkeys developed at Yerkes display a full spectrum of symptoms resembling the human disease, strengthening the case that they could be used to evaluate emerging treatments before launching human clinical Read more

The cure word, as applied to HIV

HIV researchers are becoming increasingly bold about using the "cure" word in reference to HIV/AIDS, even though nobody has been cured besides the "Berlin patient," Timothy Brown, who had a fortuitous combination of hematopoetic stem cell transplant from a genetically HIV-resistant donor. Sometimes researchers use the term "functional cure," meaning under control without drugs, to be distinct from "sterilizing cure" or "eradication," meaning the virus is gone from the body. A substantial obstacle is that HIV Read more

A sweet brain preserver: trehalose

The natural sugar trehalose is used in the food industry as a preservative and flavor enhancer. Medical researchers keep running into it when they’re looking for ways to fight neurodegenerative diseases. This paper includes patient-derived iPS cells, thanks to Emory's Laboratory for Translational Cell Read more

lab management

Lab management: leading by example

Paul Doetsch, PhD

Cancer researcher Paul Doetsch is a prominent voice in a recent feature in Science magazine’s Careers section. The article gives scientists who are setting up their laboratories advice on how to manage their laboratories and lead by example.

Doetsch holds a distinguished chair of cancer research and is associate director for basic research at Winship Cancer Institute. His research on how cells handle DNA damage has provided insights into mechanisms of tumor formation and antibiotic resistance. His lab includes five graduate students, two senior postdocs and one technical specialist.

From the article:

Doetsch says that he tries to maintain a lab culture that provides technicians, students, postdocs, and research faculty a sense of “ownership” of their projects and to give the message everyone is making a significant contribution to the research enterprise, regardless of their specific title or role.
“I make it a point to walk around my lab several times a day to chat with my group and hold individual weekly research meetings with each member to get an update of their progress and provide them with direct, constructive feedback on their activities,” he says. “I always strongly encourage everyone to discuss their results and other issues affecting their project with their lab colleagues and to not hesitate to disagree with me when necessary.”

Author Emma Hitt was herself a graduate student at Emory.

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Uncategorized Leave a comment