Overcoming cardiac pacemaker "source-sink mismatch"

Instead of complication-prone electronic cardiac pacemakers, biomedical engineers at Georgia Tech and Emory envision the creation of “biological Read more

Hope Clinic part of push to optimize HIV vaccine components

Ten years ago, the results of the RV144 trial– conducted in Thailand with the help of the US Army -- re-energized the HIV vaccine field, which had been down in the Read more

Invasive cancer cells marked by distinctive mutations

What does it take to be a leader – of cancer cells? Adam Marcus and colleagues at Winship Cancer Institute are back, with an analysis of mutations that drive metastatic behavior among groups of lung cancer cells. The findings were published this week on the cover of Journal of Cell Science, and suggest pharmacological strategies to intervene against or prevent metastasis. Marcus and former graduate student Jessica Konen previously developed a technique for selectively labeling “leader” Read more

infection

A spoonful of sugar helps infection detection

Congratulations to Kiyoko Takemiya, a postdoctoral fellow in Emory’s Division of Cardiology, working with W. Robert Taylor. At the recent American College of Cardiology meeting in Washington DC, she won first place in the competition for an ACC Foundation/ Herman K. Gold Young Investigators Award in Molecular and Cellular Cardiology.

The title of her research presentation was: A Novel Imaging Probe for the Detection of Subclinical Bacterial Infections Involving Cardiac Devices.

Takemiya, Taylor, and their colleagues (including Mark Goodman and Niren Murthy, formerly at Georgia Tech and now at UC Berkeley) developed a fluorescent probe that allows the detection of small levels of bacteria on cardiac devices. The probe was tested in rats, some of which had relatively mild local S. aureus infections. The fluorescent probe (PET is also under investigation) makes use of the properties of maltohexaose, a sugar that is taken up by bacteria but not mammalian cells.

Infection rates for implantable cardiac devices such as pacemakers have been rising, according to a 2012 paper in NEJM.

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Heart Leave a comment