NINDS supporting Emory/UF work on myotonic dystrophy

NINDS grant will support collaboration between Gary Bassell and Eric Wang on myotonic Read more

Antios moving ahead with potential drug vs hepatitis B

Antios Therapeutics is moving ahead clinical studies of an antiviral drug aimed at hepatitis Read more

Traynelis lead researcher on CureGRIN/Chan Zuckerberg award

The CureGRIN Foundation works closely with Emory pharmacologist Stephen Traynelis, who has been investigating rare genetic disorders affecting NMDA Read more

immune rejection

Sensitive to (transplant) rejection

An experimental screening method, developed by Emory and Georgia Tech scientists, aims to detect immune rejection of a transplanted organ earlier and without a biopsy needle.

The technology is based on nanoparticles that detect granzyme B enzymes produced by killer T cells. When the T cells are active, they slice up the nanoparticles, generating a fluorescent signal that is detectable in urine. The results from a mouse skin graft model were published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, from Gabe Kwong’s lab at GT and Andrew Adams’ at Emory. More extensive story here.

Co-first authors Quoc Mac and Dave Mathews

Adams is also developing technologies for imaging transplant rejection via immunoPET, with Georgia Tech’s Phil Santangelo.

 

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Immunology Leave a comment