Tracing the start of COVID-19 in GA

At a time when COVID-19 appears to be receding in much of Georgia, it’s worth revisiting the start of the pandemic in early 2020. Emory virologist Anne Piantadosi and colleagues have a paper in Viral Evolution on the earliest SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequences detected in Georgia. Analyzing relationships between those virus sequences and samples from other states and countries can give us an idea about where the first COVID-19 infections in Georgia came from. We can draw Read more

Reddit as window into opioid withdrawal strategies

Drug abuse researchers are using the social media site Reddit as a window into the experiences of people living with opioid addiction. Abeed Sarker in Emory's Department of Biomedical Informatics has a paper in Clinical Toxicology focusing on the phenomenon of “precipitated withdrawal,” in collaboration with emergency medicine specialists from Penn, Rutgers and Mt Sinai. Precipitated withdrawal is a more intense form of withdrawal that can occur when someone who was using opioids starts medication-assisted treatment Read more

CROI: HIV cure report and ongoing research

The big news out of CROI (Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections) was a report of a third person being cured of HIV infection, this time using umbilical cord blood for a hematopoetic stem cell transplant. Emory’s Carlos del Rio gave a nice overview of the achievement for NPR this morning. As del Rio explains, the field of HIV cure research took off over the last decade after Timothy Brown, known as “the Berlin patient,” Read more

horticultural therapy

Healing gardens provide beautiful therapy

Geriatric and chronic care patients at Wesley Woods Geriatric Hospital often need help improving their fine motor skills, muscle tone, range of motion, strength, and even peace of mind.

Master gardener Kirk Hines considers the Wesley Woods greenhouse another clinical space where patients can improve their skills through growing plants in therapy sessions or just enjoying the relaxation gardening can bring. For patients who can’t come to the garden, Hines brings gardening inside or even to their bedside.

“We want our patients to be successful,” says Hines. “Gardening draws on long-term memory for many of them. While they are planting tomato seeds or digging in the dirt, it takes away the anxiety they feel away from home. They don’t feel like they are in a hospital environment.”

Hines is a registered horticultural therapist who founded the program at Wesley Woods in 1993. Over those 17 years he has turned the gardens into a showpiece for sensory stimulation, with healing gardening spaces including courtyards with handrails, special walkways, and shady seating areas with fountains and goldfish.

When patients are discharged they often take the plants they have grown home with them, and many appreciative families have pitched in with their own labor and materials to keep the gardens beautiful.

Visit Emory Health magazine for more information about the healing gardens.

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