Tracing the start of COVID-19 in GA

At a time when COVID-19 appears to be receding in much of Georgia, it’s worth revisiting the start of the pandemic in early 2020. Emory virologist Anne Piantadosi and colleagues have a paper in Viral Evolution on the earliest SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequences detected in Georgia. Analyzing relationships between those virus sequences and samples from other states and countries can give us an idea about where the first COVID-19 infections in Georgia came from. We can draw Read more

Reddit as window into opioid withdrawal strategies

Drug abuse researchers are using the social media site Reddit as a window into the experiences of people living with opioid addiction. Abeed Sarker in Emory's Department of Biomedical Informatics has a paper in Clinical Toxicology focusing on the phenomenon of “precipitated withdrawal,” in collaboration with emergency medicine specialists from Penn, Rutgers and Mt Sinai. Precipitated withdrawal is a more intense form of withdrawal that can occur when someone who was using opioids starts medication-assisted treatment Read more

CROI: HIV cure report and ongoing research

The big news out of CROI (Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections) was a report of a third person being cured of HIV infection, this time using umbilical cord blood for a hematopoetic stem cell transplant. Emory’s Carlos del Rio gave a nice overview of the achievement for NPR this morning. As del Rio explains, the field of HIV cure research took off over the last decade after Timothy Brown, known as “the Berlin patient,” Read more

high blood pressure

Healthy lifestyle can lower blood pressure

A new study says that maintaining normal weight, daily vigorous exercise, eating a diet high in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and low in sodium, and taking a folic acid supplement is linked with lowering hypertension in women.

A healthy lifestyle helps your heart

A healthy lifestyle helps your heart

Reporting in the July 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists say that hypertension, or high blood pressure, contributes to more excess deaths in women than any other preventable factor. The researchers looked at the link between combinations of low-risk lifestyle factors and the risk of developing hypertension.

Allen Dollar, MD, preventive cardiologist with Emory Heart & Vascular Center, says the study by Harvard Medical School researchers points to the real benefit to women of deploying a healthy lifestyle to prevent hypertension or to control hypertension.

Essentially, this new report helps to confirm what preventive cardiologists share with women everyday, says Dollar, that they can help prevent or manage hypertension through a healthy approach to diet and exercise.

Generally, blood pressure above 140/90 is considered to be high for adults. Although hypertension can produce symptoms including fatigue, confusion, nausea, vision http://www.agfluide.com problems and excessive sweating, Dollar points out that the majority of women with mild to moderate hypertension have no symptoms that indicate their blood pressure is too high.

A blood pressure reading can reveal hypertension in the early stages when a strategy of diet changes, exercise and weight control and medication, if needed, can help prevent a host of high blood pressure related ills including heart attacks, heart failure, kidney disease and stroke, says Dollar. If a woman does not know her blood pressure, she needs to find out. If a woman learns she has high blood pressure, she can use this news as an opportunity to take control of her health.

Learn more medical advances at Emory.

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