NINDS supporting Emory/UF work on myotonic dystrophy

NINDS grant will support collaboration between Gary Bassell and Eric Wang on myotonic Read more

Antios moving ahead with potential drug vs hepatitis B

Antios Therapeutics is moving ahead clinical studies of an antiviral drug aimed at hepatitis Read more

Traynelis lead researcher on CureGRIN/Chan Zuckerberg award

The CureGRIN Foundation works closely with Emory pharmacologist Stephen Traynelis, who has been investigating rare genetic disorders affecting NMDA Read more

flu vaccine

Moving flu vaccine research forward

The scientists in the lab of Richard Compans, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at Emory, are hard at work, imagining the unimaginable: A time when patients can self-administer flu vaccines. A time when vaccination does not require exposure to inactive viruses. A time when a universal vaccine could protect from all varieties of influenza: swine, avian, seasonal and strains still emerging.

Richard Compans, PhD (right), with colleague Mark Prausnitz, PhD, from Georgia Tech

But it’s not just hope that motivates them as they work. Emory’s scientists are fighting the clock against another possible future: a time of pandemic and uncontrollable virus mutation. The recent emergence of H1N1 and H5N1, known colloquially as swine flu and avian flu, have added an even greater sense of urgency to their task.

“The H5N1—the virus derived from avian species—has a 60 percent mortality,” says Emory microbiologist Sang-Moo Kang, PhD. Yet that strain of influenza hasn’t resulted in many human deaths, because, so far, avian flu spreads only to humans who are in contact with infected birds.

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Posted on by Jennifer Johnson in Immunology Leave a comment