Saliva-based SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing

As the Atlanta area recovers from Zeta, we’d like to highlight this Journal of Clinical Microbiology paper about saliva-based SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing. It was a collaboration between the Hope Clinic and investigators at Johns Hopkins, led by epidemiologist Christopher Heaney. Infectious disease specialists Matthew Collins, Nadine Rouphael and several colleagues from Emory are co-authors. They organized the collection of saliva and blood samples from Emory COVID-19 patients at several stages: being tested, hospitalized, and recovered. Read more

Peeling away pancreatic cancers' defenses

A combination immunotherapy approach that gets through pancreatic cancers’ extra Read more

Immune cell activation in severe COVID-19 resembles lupus

In severe cases of COVID-19, Emory researchers have been observing an exuberant activation of B cells, resembling acute flares in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease. The findings point towards tests that could separate some COVID-19 patients who need immune-calming therapies from others who may not. It also may begin to explain why some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 produce abundant antibodies against the virus, yet experience poor outcomes. The results were published online on Oct. Read more

cool stuff

Please vote in Best Image contest

Emory University School of Medicine’s Office of Postdoctoral Education has posted ten dazzling images from current Emory biomedical research here, and you can vote on your favorites (VOTE HERE). The Best Image contest sets the stage for the Postdoctoral Research Symposium on May 19. A gallery showing all ten at once — larger than what you see below– is also available at this site.

Voting lasts only until Sunday (4/23), since the three contest-winning images will be part of the abstract book and other materials, and the organizers need to complete printing orders soon.Screen Shot 2016-04-19 at 12.46.17 PM

Lab Land is looking forward to learning more about the images. For now, it is fun to guess what they are. In the gallery, each one is labeled with the name of the researcher who submitted them. Read more

Posted on by Quinn Eastman in Uncategorized Leave a comment