Sunscreen: Looking Beyond the Numbers

Carl Washington, MD

Seems pretty obvious – if a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 is good, then an SPF of 100 should be at least three times as good.

Unfortunately, that is not the case.  There are other important details to consider when you are purchasing a sunscreen.

“People have become much more educated about the importance of using sunscreen, and manufacturers have responded with an abundance of products,” says Carl Washington, MD, associate professor of Dermatology at Emory University School of Medicine. “Unfortunately, the labeling can be confusing and many of the current sunscreens only contain the ingredients necessary to offer protection against sunburn, but not skin cancer or aging.”

Recently, the Food and Drug Administration created new regulations to establish standards for sunscreen manufacturers to follow before they label their products.

Under the new regulations, which will go into effect in 2012, sunscreen products that protect against all types of sun-induced skin damage will be labeled “broad spectrum” and “SPF 15” or higher on the container. Only products that have been tested to ensure they protect against both UVA (ultraviolet radiation A) and UVB (ultraviolet radiation B) radiation will be allowed to use this labeling.  Broad-spectrum sunscreens of SPF 15 and higher can also be labeled as protective against skin cancer and premature aging. The maximum SPF value is set at 50-plus because the FDA says anything higher doesn’t provide a significant amount of additional protection.

Manufacturers will have to include warning labels on products that are not broad spectrum. Products that claim to be water resistant must indicate how long the consumer should expect to be protected in the water, and using such language as “waterproof” or “sweat proof” will not be allowed.

“Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and the number of people affected keeps rising. Simply getting into the habit of using a sunscreen every day – with the appropriate levels of protection – can make a significant difference in preventing many skin cancers, as well as premature aging,” says Washington.

“These new regulations will help consumers understand the difference in degrees of sun protection, and choose carefully.”

Washington also suggests staying out of direct sunlight between 10 am and 2 pm, seeking shade when you are outdoors, remembering to reapply sunscreen every two hours and wearing protective clothing.

Be Sociable, Share!

Posted on by Kathi Baker in Uncategorized Leave a comment

About the author

Kathi Baker

Associate Director, Media Relations Manager, Broadcast Relations kobaker@emory.edu 404-727-9371 Office 404-686-5500 Pager (ID 14455) 404-227-1871 Mobile

Add a Comment